Thursday, December 18, 2008

Change the ISO Setting

If you find yourself in a situation in which the lighting isn’t quite right for your picture, it’s time
to bump up the camera’s ISO value. Remember that most, but not all, cameras come with ISO
adjustments, so review your user manual to see if this applies to your particular model. You can
see a typical ISO adjustment in the following illustration; you’ll probably find it in the onscreen
menu system, displayed in the liquid crystal display (LCD) screen on

Here are some situations in which you might need to increase the ISO:
■ You’re shooting in a low-light situation, such as early evening or indoors. Natural-light
photos have a certain appeal, and by increasing the light sensitivity of your camera you
may be able to shoot a picture without using the flash at all. Using natural light can
eliminate harsh shadows and produce more natural colors.
■ Your subject is too far away for the flash to have any effect. During the day you might
be outdoors and want to take a picture of something, but there’s not quite enough light—
such as in winter or during very overcast conditions. Your camera wants to use a flash,
but your subject is just too far away. As you’ll see in Chapter 5, the flash on your digital
camera has a very limited range; so to properly expose your picture, you need to use
“faster film”—that is, increase the camera’s ISO setting.
■ You’re shooting at night. Most digital cameras have limited ability to take pictures at
night or in near total darkness. As a result, if you want to capture anything at all with a
night shot, you may need to increase the camera’s light sensitivity to the maximum.

Tips:
If night photography interests you, investigate what I refer to as “performance” digital
cameras—cameras that include manually adjustable shutter speeds and apertures.
Using more full-featured cameras lets you perform long exposures for light trails,
glowing illuminated signage, and other special effects.

7 comments:

逍摄遥影 said...

as long as you have tripod, then ISO even can set to 100 or 200 when shoot at night time especially night scenery. but ur shutter speed have to set to more than 10 second mayb and f8-f10.

Spooi said...

yeah, i know that.
Mostly need tripod when shooting at night.
now i am wan to try shooting at night without tripod...shutter speed need to be high

逍摄遥影 said...

ermm, i don think use high shutter speed can shoot at night. too fast then the light is not enough to be captured by the sensor although u set aperture to f3.5. end up the photo will be very dark. mayb u can try and see next time

Spooi said...

BUt i saw one article said can make it, maybe difficult...
need to try and see lo

逍摄遥影 said...

maybe they wan to get any effect on it or capture some moving object at night or reduce the hand shaken risk then set high shutter and ISO1600 or 3200. high end DSLR can do so i think and not much noise will be noticed.mayb i also try nex time. ha

Spooi said...

See the artile? Dont use the highest ISO all the time ya...Mine one the highest ISO can up to 1600 only

逍摄遥影 said...

mine one also up to 1600. 400 or 800 still ok for night time without tripod. as long as u don zoom in too much to see the picture then wont notice one significant noise. ha

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Culinary Unit Converter